Language policy research

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Re: Language policy research

Postby Richard » 24 Sep 2020 07:38

ronnakritong wrote:the news writers typically included Te reo Maori in certain types of news, espectially in Sport news


At the risk of asking you to do even more extra work, I'm guessing that Maori words only appear in reports on certain sports. My hypothesis is that reports on rugby contain fairly frequent Maori words, but that reports on cricket do not. How are my intuitions?
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Re: Language policy research

Postby ronnakritong » 24 Sep 2020 22:56

Richard wrote:
ronnakritong wrote:the news writers typically included Te reo Maori in certain types of news, espectially in Sport news


My hypothesis is that reports on rugby contain fairly frequent Maori words, but that reports on cricket do not. How are my intuitions?


Yes your hypothesis is right, proven by the articles I found. Rugby-related news appeared to contain words in Maori (in addition to the Maori names).
https://www.nzherald.co.nz/rotorua-dail ... d=12355225 --> like this. The author used 'kaupapa' to mean a principle (instead of simply saying principle in English / ref: https://teara.govt.nz/en/papatuanuku-th ... %20actions.)

Meanwhile, in the same source, cricket news did not have any words in Maori --> https://www.nzherald.co.nz/rotorua-dail ... d=12362977
As such, I hypothesize from your hypothesis that news about rugby, as being the national sport, could actively engage a lot of kiwi readers, making it possible to promote the language.

Another point which I've recently found is that when they talked about things which were related to Maori, the used Maori loan words (e.g. "a little boy just trying to make his koro proud." in https://www.nzherald.co.nz/rotorua-dail ... d=12367574) Koro = an elderly Māori man.
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Re: Language policy research

Postby Tepsuriwong » 27 Sep 2020 09:42

I can be Jatuporn's subject!.
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Re: Language policy research

Postby stevelouw » 01 Oct 2020 06:11

Can language policy research look at micro rather than macro contexts? I have a colleague who feels very strongly about 'English-only' in his classrooms, and I am a lot more relaxed about my students using Thai in class during activities. He argues strongly to defend his position, and reminds students constantly to use English, and in some classes makes it an explicit 'rule' to only speak English. I wonder how students feel about this, and whether this imposed L2 only policy in the classroom makes sense to them. Indeed, perhaps they actually like having an explicit language policy in the classroom. A relatively easy way to find out is to survey the students to find out whether they follow the English-only policy, and how helpful they find it for language learning.
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Re: Language policy research

Postby Richard » 01 Oct 2020 06:33

stevelouw wrote:Can language policy research look at micro rather than macro contexts?

Definitely. KMUTT currently has a policy that teaching should be online; Weimer (2002) in discussing power in education talks about course policies; companies' style guides for communication are a form of policy. On the issue of L1 use, Hunt (2012) 'Managing method' in RELC Journal could provide a useful model for investigating the issue. It also contains a really good quote about the institution's English-only policy: "resistance by teachers to putative policy and its manifestation in managerial notices is exemplified clearly by Francis who said, ‘I decided to ignore that email,
actually after I read that I thought I’ll try to use more Arabic in class. I found it insulting’. "
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